Thursday Trivia

Bad postal worker.

The United States Postal Service announced earlier last week that they are considering ending service on Saturdays. While that would hurt most of the population, though, it wouldn’t hurt the folks in towns like Loma Linda, California – which, with a large Seventh-Day Adventist population, doesn’t deliver mail on Saturdays. (I guess they’d take Sunday delivery away from them instead.)

On that note, here’s four more bits of trivia about the Postal Service, after the jump!

Good postal worker.

2. On the opposite end of the spectrum, until 1912, mail was delivered seven days a week (when clergymen cried foul about postal workers missing services).

3. While no Postmaster General has gone on to become President, they had the chance – they were in the Presidential chain of succession until 1970, when Richard Nixon signed the Postal Reorganization Act, ending the Cabinet-level Post Office Department and creating the publicly-chartered but independent United States Postal Service.

4. Along with having 660 thousand workers (the second-largest employer in America, behind only Wal-Mart), the Postal Service also has the largest civilian auto fleet in the world with 260 thousand minivans and Long Life Vehicles.

5. As a result, the USPS consumes over 800 million gallons of gasoline, and with every penny increase in the price of gas, is forced to spend $8 million more of their already exorbitant $2.4 billion fuel budget.

Join me next week for another installment of Thursday Trivia, when we discuss five bits of trivia about a new topic to be decided.

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